Lauren in the Attic

My name is Lauren, I live in Melbourne, Australia. I sleep in the attic.
What’s the time, Mr Wolf?
Pie time!

What’s the time, Mr Wolf?
Pie time!

odditiesoflife:

Victorian Postmortem Photography

Painting the dead was a common occurrence for centuries, so it’s no surprise that in the Victorian era, postmortem photography became standard practice. 

The beginnings of memento mori photography can be traced back to the invention of photography. During the 19th century, postmortem portraits were used to announce and mourn the death of a loved one, especially a baby or child. All social classes engaged in the practice, which became more widespread after the introduction of the daguerreotype photo in 1839. The subjects of the photos were generally arranged to appear as if asleep or even in standing positions. 

For the poor during this era, many peoples only photograph was taken after they died. Families would scrape together enough money to have a memorial photo of the deceased family member with surviving members. For many, these staged photos were the only family portraits ever taken. These photos were kept in the family’s memorial album.

source 1, 2, 3

So weird.

(via odditiesoflife)

odditiesoflife:

Amazing Art on Japanese Manhole Covers

In Japan, there are many cities and towns that place visually stunning works of art right underneath pedestrians’ feet. There are almost 6,000 of these covers around the country, turning unattractive necessities into eye candy. Photographer S. Morita has documented hundreds of these covers over the years which are available on Morita’s Flickr page.

(Source: flavorwire.com, via odditiesoflife)

skunkbear:

These have been floating around the internet for years - but I just came across them.  You can see more of these drawings (there are dozens), and the students written impressions of scientists, over at the FermiLab Education Office's website.

archatlas:

Plastic Classics Jane Perkins

"In my current body of work, Plastic Classics, Old Masters are given a contemporary twist. I use anything of the right size, shape or colour: toys, shells, buttons, beads, jewellery, curtain hooks, springs etc. No colour is added - everything is used exactly ‘as found’. Impressionist paintings are the perfect inspiration for my work. It needs to be viewed in two ways (as in Impressionism) - from a distance to make sense of the whole image, and close up to identify the materials used (the brush strokes)."

(via staceythinx)